Un-multi-tasking

Blog hopping

I got a lovely note from the fabulous Pat Pauly asking me if I would be part of a blog hopping exercise that was originally started by Kathy Loomis. As I think the world of both of these artists, I agreed. The stipulation was that I answer 4 questions, and pass this exercise along to another artist that I admire and follow. I chose Terry Jarrad Dimond.

So here goes:What am I working on?

Sometimes I feel like a pingpong ball without a table. My studio space at home only has one design wall which measures about 8’ high by 7’ wide. Which is precisely why I am working on a series of quilts that is larger than that wall- call it an experiment in insanity. 

Having only one design wall is a huge limitation since it limits the number of pieces that I can work on at any one time. I can really only design one quilt at a time... but I am building a studio so that limitation will be lifted.  Right now I am piecing a pretty complex piece that will probably take up my design wall for another 2 months at least. Meanwhile I have 4 more quilts waiting in the wings to be machine quilted. I am not allowed to show any of these quilts right now since they are under consideration for an exhibition, and I have agreed not to post any photos.
I tend to work on one or two series at a time, and currently four of those quilts are in a new series called Mexico. and one is a very large experiment in scribbling- a technique that I have been trying to perfect for years. Here is a shot of a detail. Again.... so sorry but I can not post photos yet. Stay tuned!


How does my work differ from others of its genre?
Gosh that is a hard question since it assumes that it is different. I definitely work abstractly, and my art is heavily influenced by my emotional state. I am moved by the horrible state of conflict in the world, and I think that this is reflected in my pieces. I do not strive for pretty pieces, and I think some of my work is unsettling and perhaps a bit jarring. 
I focus almost exclusively on lines. Sometimes those lines are thin, sometimes thick, sometimes straight and sometimes curved. I am more comfortable with building complex shapes out of lines rather than constructing my pieces out of large shapes. 

Why do I do what I do?
I do what I do because I am compelled to make art.
I do not feel like this is a choice, it is an imperative.
Fabric is the way I choose to express many emotions that I can not convey verbally.  

How does my process work?
I do not sketch and I do not use a camera.
I do not have a journal. 
And I do not use the computer to sketch.
I am tied to a computer all day at work, and I do not want to have it invade my art world. 
I am very heavily influenced by the work of Pierre Soulages and Cy Twombly. Their work amazes me and I wish I could get the fluidity of Twombly’s lines in my own work. I study art and love love love Pinterest since it allows me to create and collect visual scrap books of ideas. Now that I have my own voice, I am not as worried about being derivative. I spend lots of time studying the quality of lines- whether it is William Anasazi’s work or Franz Kline. 

I work intuitively, always with music or podcasts playing. 
I am pretty hard on myself, and often get fatigued at the end of piecing a large composition... I just want it to be over. 
Most of my work is machine pieced using some pretty complicated tailoring techniques.  I love engineering how pieces come together, and I have to spend lots of time figuring out what order to sew pieces in. 
Sometimes I slash through finished pieces cutting circles into the fabric or insetting lines.It is a bit like Russian roulette and if I make a mistake, the piece is ruined. But using this technique is very liberating. For other pieces, I put everything up on a design wall before I sew one seam. I will move pieces obsessively- until I get the right balance. I like working with straightedges and precision. 

Terry Jarrad-Dimond


And now an introduction to an artist whose work I admire and who is an accomplished blogger and writer.
I started following Terry's work when I met her at Nancy Crow's workshop many years ago. I was a fledgling quilter with only a year or two under my belt, and Terry was the star pupil- working very large and very independently. I remember staring over at her wall hoping that one day I might be 1/2 as accomplished as she was and is. You can see her work at her website  here.
And now an introduction to an artist whose work I admire and who is an accomplished blogger and writer.
I started following Terry's work when I met her at Nancy Crow's workshop many years ago. I was a fledgling quilter with only a year or two under my belt, and Terry was the star pupil- working very large and very independently. I remember staring over at her wall and hoping that one day I might be 1/2 as accomplished as she was and is. You can see her work here.




When I returned from the Barn, I looked up Terry on line and started reading her blog Studio 24-7. I have been a passionate follower ever since. I like the fact that Terry puts her work out there, is not content to stay stagnant, and covers all type of medium- not just fabric. I love seeing her experiments with different techniques and it has been a joy to see her work change and evolve.
When I first met Terry she was working very large with dazzling hand dyed solid fabrics. Her forms are luscious and her colors are rich. Her work looks deceptively simple until you try to cut her marvelous shapes free hand, maintaining a fluidity that is all her own. 



Over the years she started to experiment with surface treatments, and her bright color treatment has changed to rich monochrome values. But her wonderful organic shapes have been consistent. Her husband, Tom is an artist as well. On her site you can view his work in a few posts and see how his work complements Terry's. I would love to be a guest at their dinner table. The discussions must be amazing! 
Terry will be posting on the blog hop next week and I can hardly wait to see what new work she is up to.